Black Friday Sale 2016

Black Friday Nunchaku Sale

Black Friday Nunchaku Sale Stop by USA Nunchaku this Black Friday for our 24 hour Black Friday Nunchaku Sale.  For 24 hours all cocobolo in stock are 15% off.

Cut from the hard to find dense cocobolo wood, these nunchaku are not only beautiful, they are some of the heaviest strongest sets we offer. The late 2012 batch are cut in a straight octagon shape. Get them while they are here. All are handmade in the United States.

These training weapons are made of top grade  and  match real weapons in length, size, weight, and feel. These 7.75″ cocobolo nunchaku constructed to be durable, cut resistant, and remarkably stiff, which allow martial artists to master techniques, footwork, and the basic stances.  USA Nunchaku’s Cocobolo Traditional Octagon Nunchaku are made from cocobolo these nunchaku are all are handmade, shaped, oiled, sanded and strung.  Like all of our nunchaku each of one of kind.  The weapon you see is the exact one you will receive.  100% made in the United States.

 

New Nunchaku Stock

New Nunchaku Stock

New Nunchaku Stock
Off the drying strings and into be strung. Lots of cocobolo to choose from.

It will only be matter of days now.  Our new nunchaku stock will be complete.  All the new stock is dry and being strung.  We were waiting for some new colors of para-cord to arrive for the 2017 holiday batches.  It has been hot, the main woodshop doesn’t have AC, so when it’s 96 outside, it’s 115 inside.  While the heat has been uncomfortable, we scored some great pieces of bloodwood and cocobolo this time and we can’t wait to get them in the store for all to see.  We have smaller lengths and larger lengths of nunchaku in cocobolo, red oak, and bloodwood as well as the standard 12″ styles.

Stringing takes some time but we will be uploading them as fast as possible.  Unlike other stores, we have to take photos of each pair because the one you see is the one you get.  In the end it is all worth it.  Handmade martial arts nunchaku crafted in the USA.  Our nunchaku are a perfect gift for a martial artist.  Each one unique.  Each one an individual like the martial arts practitioner who uses them.  That is one of the great things about our nunchaku.  You will always know which is yours on your schools weapon rack. Cocobolo Nunchaku

Look for the new stock to hit the store around 8/30/16.  We will be sending out a newsletter or registered users on the arrival of our new stock  so sign up soon!  Also twitter and Facebook, Google plus will get the release.  This time due to the ever growing demand, we have already begun the next batch to ensure we can keep up with the holiday shopping season, but quantiles are limited in each batch so check the website often.

How to String Nunchaku

 Basic 2 Rope Method of Stringing Nunchaku

This article teaches the 2 string method on how to string nunchaku.  As we sell more and more of our nunchaku we have found that many martial artist do not know how to fix and or re-tie their nunchaku.

Let us first state some facts before getting into how to tie nunchaku..  Just like your martial arts moves, there are many ways to arrive at the end.  In other words, there is no one right way to tie them.  A far as how to string nunchaku, some ways are better than others and some ways of stringing nunchaku require the correct rope and or nunchaku.  Many methods you may find are partly for show while others are for function.  The one thing that we have found is that there is no information on the internet  that shows how to tie them well.  This brings us to this lesson of nunchaku stringing.  The method below for tying nunchaku is the “two rope” method taught to me by my instructors many years ago.  Our style is Northern Boxing Style Kung fu requiring a short 3 inch rope length between the nunchaku.  You will find that different martial arts styles require other lengths depending on the applications.  Rope lengths will always wind up being a personal preference for each user.

restring tools 1
restring tools 1
  • Bell Wire
  • wire snips
  • small flat head screw driver
  • sissors
  • plyers
  • at least 3 ft of rope

The secret is in the bell wire tool.  It needs to be thin enough to fit through the last stage but thick enough to last through the process.  Almost any hardware store will sell this in small spools.  All the other tools you can find around the house.  The photos below show how to make your tool which can be used a number of times.


Cut about 12 inches of wire and fold in the middle making a half moon.
Cut about 12 inches of wire and fold in the middle making a half moo
bend the ends
bend the ends
Trim if needed.
Trim if needed.
Finished re-string nunchaku tool
Finished re-string nunchaku tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Next is the stringing of the nunchaku. It is important to have a flat table that you can lay the nunchaku out on. This will help keep things organized as you go through the process.

Lay flat head to head
insert tool
insert tool
pull enough to thread your rope
pull enough to thread your rope
make sure rope is even, pull through.
make sure rope is even, pull through.
pull though, re check your even lengths.
pull though, re check your even lengths.
Use the tool to thread to the other side.
Use the tool to thread to the other side.
Continue and pull
Continue and pull
next using the opposite end of the tool...
next using the opposite end of the tool…
Feed tool through top.
Feed tool through top.
Pull the open ends through the loop.
Pull the open ends through the loop.
Holding the open ends, pull out the slack.
Holding the open ends, pull out the slack.
Pull...
Pull…
pull...
pull…
Pull until all slack is out.
Pull until all slack is out.
Insert rounded end of tool into other nunchaku.
Insert rounded end of tool into other nunchaku.
Attach the first string
Attach the first string
Pull back through.
Pull back through.
Then continue to pull it through the other side.
Then continue to pull it through the other side.
Repeat process pulling the other string through.
Repeat process pulling the other string through.
Pull the second open string through.
Pull the second open string through.
Start of last section
Start of last section

The last section: How to String Nunchaku

At this point you should have exactly what is pictured above.  If you don’t,  you should start over.  The beauty of this method is that you have not cut anything yet, so using the same string can be done.  You want to make sure you have even lengths of rope at this point and that you have a bout 1 1/2″ of rope between the two nunchaku with no slack or kinks.

Lay ropes on opposite sides, and push round end of tool through top.
Lay ropes on opposite sides, and push round end of tool through top.
Pull one of the rope ends through.
Pull one of the rope ends through.
Lay to the right side.
Lay to the right side.
Use tool again to pull remaining string.
Use tool again to pull remaining string.
Pull through and lay on left side.
Pull through and lay on left side.
*Important* Rotate top nunchaku and wrap open strings around the string between the nunchaku.
*Important* Rotate top nunchaku and wrap open strings around the string between the nunchaku.
Tie the open ends to a double knot. "box knot"
Tie the open ends to a double knot. “box knot”
Distance check.
Distance check.

Rope Lengths

At this point you are ready to size and cut your rope.  Where you put the knot will determine how much rope you have between the nunchaku.

Using the line tool, tighten your knot.
Using the line tool, tighten your knot.
Cut off your extra rope leaving some extra before the knot.
Cut off your extra rope leaving some extra before the knot.
Cut knot with some extra.
Cut knot with some extra.
Using the lighter heat the frayed edges to seal the cut cord.
Using the lighter heat the frayed edges to seal the cut cord.
Use the pliers to compress the knot while still hot.
Use the pliers to compress the knot while still hot.
pull the knot tight to the top of the nunchaku. You can use the pliers and or screwdriver to press it in farther.
using the small Philips head, draw back the knot.
how to string nuncahku
pull the knot tight to the top of the nunchaku. You can use the pliers and or screwdriver to press it in farther. pull the knot tight to the top of the nunchaku. You can use the pliers and or screwdriver to press it in farther.

That concludes the stringing process.  Only forty some odd steps.  If you are asking yourself “This doesn’t seem like fun”, it’s not.  This is something we do as a bonus for our customers.  As we stated before their are other ways to string nunchaku.  we have found this is the easiest, safest and most practical way to do the stringing.  Keep in mind, the thicker the rope, the harder each step is to complete.  If the rope is too thick, the last steps can be very challenging.

Thank you for taking the time to read our stringing guide and don’t forget to stop by the shop as we are always releasing new nunchaku made from hardwoods, all 100% American.


History of the Nunchaku

Red Heart Nunchaku
Handmade Nunchaku

The nunchaku (Japanese: ヌンチャク Hepburn: nunchaku?, often “nunchuks “, “num-chuk”, “danger sticks”, “juan-tuo”, “chuka sticks'”[1] or “chainsticks” in English) is a traditional Okinawan martial arts weapon consisting of two sticks connected at one end by a short chain or rope. Used by Okinawan nobles,[citation needed] it was not a historically popular weapon because it was ineffective against the most widely used weapons of that time, and because few techniques for its use existed. The two sections of the weapon are commonly made out of wood, while the link is a cord or a metal chain. The nunchaku is most widely used in martial arts such as Okinawan kobudō and karate, and is used as a training weapon, since it allows the development of quicker hand movements and improves posture. Many varieties of nunchaku are available.

During the Japanese occupation of Okinawa some 350 years ago, invading warlords prohibited the use of ordinary weapons such as the gun, sword and spear. So, the Okinawans turned to karate and kobu-do, which is the art of karate weapons such as the bo (a staff), sai (a short sword with the two prongs at the handle, kama (a sickle), and surushin, a length of rope with weights attached to both ends) for protection. Some kobu-do weapons were farm implements which the ingenious farmers converted into effective protective devices. For instance, the forerunner of the nunchaku was an instrument used to pound grain, which was later put to practical use as a weapon. The nunchaku was constructed of two hardwood sticks which were securely connected by rope braided from horses’ tails. Today, the sticks are tied with rope or chain. Because of is innocent appearance, nunchucks could easily be mistaken for a toy or harmless bundle of sticks. In a defensive situation, however, it could be used to strike, block, hit, twist and pinch

Classical nunchuku dimensions conform to their user’s anatomy. The linking chain is the length of the back of the user’s hand. The two sticks are as long as the distance between the user’s wrist and elbow. These dimensions are optimal, they allow the execution of many maneuvers.

Also known as nunchaku, nunchucks, chucks or chain sticks, originally a farm tool used to harvest rice, it developed into a traditional Okinawan weapon and consists of two sticks connected at their ends with a short chain or rope.

Blonde Cocobolo Nunchaku

Blonde Cocobolo Nunchaku

Blonde Cocobolo NunchakuThis pair was a special cut fro the master block of cocobolo we used.  The oils have set out the great colors in the wood grain.  These are not stained.  The lighter pulp wood looks blonde next to the fiery red in the dark cocobolo grains.  I have number of other cocobolo in the store now but this one we are listing alone in the store. This is why I’ve decided to call it Blonde Cocobolo Nunchaku.

Stop  by the shop to check them all out.

Coming up on the next round we will be cutting blood wood and will be featuring the return of the Lignum Vitae (ironwood)nunchaku.

Lignum Vitae (Genuine) is an exotic wood native to the tropical regions of the Americas. It is a very hard, dense, and heavy wood, with a fine texture. The heartwood color ranges from a dark greenish brown to black. Lignum Vitae is excellent for wood turning, as well as being used for bearings, bushings, some marine applications, and mallet heads. It has an oily to waxy character and takes a high polish.

Nunchaku Handmade in America

Nunchaku Handmade in America

ash NunchakuOne of the big stories in politics and the news is American jobs and companies making products in the states as opposed to imports from other countries.  Martial arts in America is as popular as ever.  I love the fact that we provide a great product that can be produced and used here at home.

I started making nunchaku back in 1998.  After my first year studying in my local kung fu school, my instructors has finally started teaching us the basics of our first weapons, the jo staff and nunchaku were the first ones that we were shown.  The staff was cut and dry, but the nunchaku was another story.

Ironwood Nunchaku To be taught nunchaku forms in any martial arts school most will find the only acceptable kind of nunchaku are the wooden corded type.  These type of nunchaku are called traditional octagon in shape.  While I was able to find this type in the typical Asian warehouse outlet stores online like my teachers, only a very generic version was available.  they were too thick, and felt horrible.  they were also stained and not even strung together.  That dreadful $5 to$19 product was always the same  lifeless weapon in a clear plastic bag.  This is how the making of our handmade nunchaku came to be.

Locust Wood Nunchaku
From tree to block the Locust wood is cut down to make nunchaku.

Our nunchaku are made by hand.  Each one is made by a martial artist in a wood shop, not a robotic Chinese factory.  We sand them oil and dry them and then string them with strong quality para-cord.  Rather than feature “some kind of stained wood”  we made our nunchaku from dense hardwoods of different weights like cocobolo, red oak, bloodwood and locust to name a few.  It’s an American product for a great American past time.

Snow Storm Nunchaku from Locust Wood.

2016 Snow storm
It just keeps on snowing

The second batch for 2016 are going to be great!  I’m featuring three woods this time,  red oak, cocobolo and locust.  The red oak is from our new local importer that has given me great access to the warehouse and lets me pick my own stock.  This time we had a bonus, new cocobolo uncut!  I grabbed some to add to this batch because it’s so hard to find to the right sizes.  My third feature this time is Locust.  This is from a tree in my back yard that landed in my pool 2 winters ago during a freak snow storm in the north east that knocked down trees everywhere here in PA because the leaves were still on the trees when the snow hit.  You will not find Locust wood nunchaku anywhere else, period.  These are 100% from Central Pennsylvania, USA milled from the raw tree, by us and turned into nunchaku.  These are my second favorite colors of natural hardwoods.

Locust Wood Nunchaku
From tree to block the Locust wood is cut down to make nunchaku.

When finished the nunchaku will be a olive color with rich grain patterns.  This first batch was milled in 2014 so I’m excited to get back to this and get some more Locust wood nunchaku ready for the store.

We have just finished up the first of the raw locust wood blanks so look for them in the shop in the coming weeks.

We have gotten some requests for special woods to be fashioned in the last month.  I’ve decided to start setting up polls for our customers to submit their favorites and wood choices they would like to see featured next in our online store.  Wood Request page

Nunchaku Practice Moves

Nunchaku Practice Moves

Nunchaku Practice FormsThe best policy is to study your forms given to you by your instructor.  There are some moves that can be practiced on the side to improve your over all mastery of the nunchaku practice moves and motions. Of course practice makes perfect.  Below is a great you tube video on some nunchaku moves and some basic considerations for practice.

 

[contentcards url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YezY3SnflQ” target=”_blank”]

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